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Annual Report 2007-2008


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Letter from the Chief Administrator
to the Minister of Justice

September 30, 2008

The Honourable Robert Nicholson
Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada
284 Wellington Street
Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0A6

Dear Minister:

Pursuant to subsection 12(1) of the Courts Administration Service Act, I am pleased to submit the fifth annual report on the activities of the Courts Administration Service for the 2007-2008 fiscal year.

The report presents an overview of the Service's activities and accomplishments from the beginning of April 2007 to the end of March 2008. It also conveys the important work accomplished by the Service's employees in providing quality registry and administrative services to the Federal Court of Appeal, the Federal Court, the Court Martial Appeal Court of Canada and the Tax Court of Canada.

Yours truly,

R.P. Guenette
Chief Administrator

Message from the Chief Administrator

I am honoured to present this Annual Report outlining the accomplishments of the Courts Administration Service (the Service) for 2007-2008. As the year concludes, I firmly believe that CAS continues to progress and improve in the fulfillment of its mandate as outlined in the Courts Administration Service Act.

During the past year, the Service continued to focus on modernization and technology. The Service's e-filing initiative was broadened to include an increased number of proceedings, thereby facilitating access to the courts by various stakeholders. A variety of "e-projects" was also initiated with a view to developing a common Case Management System that will service the four courts supported by the Service.

The organizational structure of the Service was also finalized with the permanent staffing of key senior positions, and particularly that of the Deputy Chief Administrator, Registry Services, who oversees registry and regional operations. With its organizational structure firmly in place, the Service is optimally positioned to keep moving forward.

During the course of the year, the Service was involved in a number of cross-departmental initiatives such as the provision of certain forms of support to Special Advocates pursuant to Bill C-3, and the electronic filing of Income Tax and GST certificates by selected regional offices of the Canada Revenue Agency. Such cross-departmental initiatives are new to the Service, but represent exciting opportunities.

All these results are very positive and place the Service as a world leader in courts' administration. Ongoing visits and exchanges with Russian, Ukrainian and Chinese judicial delegations continue to attest to the Service's leadership position.

As we look ahead, we can be proud of the accomplishments of the past year, confident that they form part of the foundation upon which CAS may continue to build.

 

Raymond P. Guenette

Table of Content

The Courts Administration Service - An Overview

The Service in Brief

Our Vision, Our Priorities

The Courts

Registry Services
Operational Training
Technology and Re-Engineering in Case Management
Review of processes within Registry Services
Bill C-3 and Special Advocates

Judicial Services

Corporate Services
Human Resources

The Service broadens its horizons
Canada-Ukraine
Canada-China

Appendices

Financial Reports

How to Contact the Service

The Courts in Statistics

Glossary

The Courts Administration Service - An Overview

The Service in Brief

The role of the Service is to provide registry, judicial and corporate services to four courts of law - the Federal Court of Appeal, the Federal Court, the Court Martial Appeal Court of Canada and the Tax Court of Canada.

These services make it easier for individuals, companies, organizations, and the Government of Canada to submit disputes and other matters to the courts. They also enable the courts to hear and resolve the cases before them fairly, expeditiously and as efficiently as possible.

The mandate of the Service

  • to ensure the effective and efficient provision of services to the four courts;
  • to enhance the judicial independence of the courts by placing them at arm's length from the Government of Canada; and
  • to enhance accountability for the use of public money.

The functions of the Service

  • providing litigants and their counsel with services relating to court hearings;
  • informing litigants about rules of practice, court directives and procedures;
  • maintaining court records;
  • acting as liaison between the judiciary, the legal profession and lay litigants;
  • processing documents filed by or issued to litigants;
  • recording all proceedings;
  • serving as the entity where individuals seeking enforcement of decisions made by the courts and federal administrative tribunals, such as the Canada Industrial Relations Board and the Canadian Human Rights Tribunal, may file pertinent documents; and
  • providing judges, prothonotaries and staff with library services, appropriate facilities and security;
  • providing support services to the judiciary.

Powers and functions of the Chief Administrator

  • effective and efficient management and administration of all court services, including court facilities, libraries, corporate services and staffing;
  • structuring registry operations and preparing budgets, in consultation with the chief justices of the four courts, for the requirements of those courts and the related needs of the Service.

Our Vision, Our Priorities

The Service's mission is one of excellence. We work daily towards the ultimate goal of offering a single point of service, in both official languages, while enhancing the judicial independence of the Federal Court of Appeal, the Federal Court, the Court Martial Appeal Court of Canada and the Tax Court of Canada.

The Service's mission is to be recognized as a national and international model of excellence in the administration of justice. We also ensure that Canadians are able to have access, as quickly as possible, to an efficient, fair and precise process for dispute resolution in each of the courts that we serve.

The Courts

Established in 2003 when the Courts Administration Service Act (CAS Act) came into force, the Service has the mandate to provide efficient registry and administrative services to the Federal Court of Appeal, the Federal Court, the Court Martial Appeal Court of Canada and the Tax Court of Canada.

The four courts served by the Service are superior courts of record. All of these courts were created by the Parliament of Canada pursuant to its authority under section 101 of the Constitution Act, 1867 to establish courts "for the better administration of the Laws of Canada."

Federal Court of Appeal

The Federal Court of Appeal has jurisdiction to hear appeals from decisions of the Federal Court and the Tax Court of Canada and certain other statutory appeals. It also has exclusive jurisdiction to hear and determine applications for judicial review of decisions of 16 federal boards, commissions and tribunals listed in section 28 of the Federal Courts Act. Parties to a proceeding in the Federal Court of Appeal may be granted leave, or permission, to appeal a decision of the Federal Court of Appeal to the Supreme Court of Canada if the case involves a question of public importance. Pursuant to section 5(1) of the Federal Courts Act, the full judicial complement of the Federal Court of Appeal consists of the Chief Justice and 12 other judges. For further information on the Federal Court of Appeal, please refer to www.fca-caf.gc.ca.

Federal Court

The Federal Court is a trial court. It has original, but not exclusive, jurisdiction over cases by and against the Crown (including Aboriginal law claims), and proceedings involving admiralty law and intellectual property law. It also has exclusive jurisdiction over national security proceedings and appeals under 110 federal statutes, as well as applications for judicial review of the decisions of all federal boards, commissions and tribunals other than those over which the Federal Court of Appeal has jurisdiction. This jurisdiction includes, in parti-cular, applications for judicial review of decisions of the Immigration and Refugee Board. Pursuant to section 5.1(1) of the Federal Courts Act, the full judicial complement of the Federal Court consists of the Chief Justice and 32 other full-time judges. For further information on the Federal Court, please refer to www.fct-cf.gc.ca.

Court Martial Appeal Court of Canada

The main function of the Court Martial Appeal Court of Canada is to hear appeals from courts martial, which are military courts established under the National Defence Act and which hear cases under the Code of Service Discipline found in Parts III and VII of that Act. Certain judges of the Federal Court of Appeal and the Federal Court, as well as incumbent trial and appellate judges of the provincial superior courts, are members of this Court. For further information on the Court Martial Appeal Court of Canada, please refer to www.cmac-cacm.ca.

Tax Court of Canada

The Tax Court of Canada is a specialized court of law that decides matters involving taxpayers and the federal taxation authorities. The Court enables taxpayers and businesses to resolve disputes arising from such issues as payment of an income tax amount, goods and services tax rebates, and eligibility for employment insurance benefits and the Canada Pension Plan. There are two separate appeal procedures at the Tax Court of Canada: the general and the informal. Under the general procedure, formalities play an important role and many rules of procedure must be followed at all stages of the appeal process. The informal appeal procedure allows for simplified rules of procedure and more flexible evidence rules than under the general procedure. For further information on the Tax Court of Canada, please refer to www.tcc-cci.gc.ca.

The Judges

On March 31, 2008, the Federal Court of Appeal consisted of the Chief Justice, 10 judges and 3 supernumerary judges.

The Federal Court consisted of the Chief Justice, 28 judges, 3 supernumerary judges, 4 deputy judges and 6 prothonotaries.

The Court Martial Appeal Court of Canada consisted of the Chief Justice and 59 designated judges.

The Tax Court of Canada consisted of the Chief Justice, 19 judges and 5 supernumerary judges.

Registry Services

CAS provides Registry Services to the four federal courts: the Federal Court of Appeal, the Federal Court, the Court Martial Appeal Court of Canada and the Tax Court of Canada. CAS Registry Services Division provides all operational and registry functions necessary for the four courts to operate thus meeting all of the Courts' requirements and also ensures public access to the courts and to court records nationally.

The Registry Services Branch has offices and staff in Ottawa, as well as in regional and local offices across the country: Vancouver, Calgary, Edmonton, Winnipeg, Toronto, Montréal, Québec City, Halifax and Fredericton. As well, CAS has a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) in place with the government of Nunavut for the use of courtrooms in Iqaluit and for the reception of documents for the four courts. CAS also has MOUs in place for the use of courtrooms, and to assure basic registry functions, for the Federal Court of Appeal and the Federal Court, in St. John's (Nfld.), Charlottetown, Saint-John (New Brunswick), Regina, Saskatoon, Yellowknife and Whitehorse.

The following are a few examples of specific functions carried out by Registry Services:

  • providing judges and prothonotaries with direct support services before, during and after court hearings;
  • supporting court processes before, during and after court hearings;
  • providing litigants and their counsel with services relating to court hearings;
  • informing litigants on rules of practice, court directives and procedures;
  • maintaining court records;
  • processing documents filed by or issued to litigants, such as court decisions, and recording all proceedings;
  • serving as a depository to allow for the enforcement of decisions made by the courts and federal administrative tribunals, such as the Canada Industrial Relations Board and Canadian Human Rights Tribunal;
  • assessment of bills of costs.

The inherent nature of Registry work is reactive as CAS has virtually no control over the number of cases filed each year in the four courts. This unpredictable environment requires Registry Services to adjust rapidly to new demands and to be fully aware of any upcoming legislative changes that could affect the future workload of the four courts.

Operational Training

Registry Services also performs an important activity that enhances staff's professional development and improves service delivery, by providing formal training to all operational staff, and in particular to new employees, on a wide range of registry-related subjects. There are three full-time trainers who deliver 10 different modules to staff across the country, depending on needs identified by operational managers. The modules pertain to:

  • Admiralty (2 days)
  • Client Service and Communications (1 1/2 days)
  • Courts Administration (1 day)
  • Court Registrar - Federal Court of Appeal and Federal Court (3 days)
  • Court Registrar - Tax Court of Canada (2 days)
  • Court Usher - Federal Court of Appeal and Federal Court (1 1/2 days)
  • Immigration (1 1/2 days)
  • Jurisdiction of the Federal Courts (2 1/2 days)
  • Rules and Registry Procedures - Tax Court of Canada (3 days)
  • Rules of the Federal Court of Appeal and Federal Court (2 1/2 days)

Technology and Re-Engineering in Case Management

In its quest to continually improve service delivery to the judiciary, to the legal profession and to the general public, Registry Services has been working on key modernization initiatives. These initiatives include the implementation of new technologies and in particular improvements to the case management system. At the end of the fiscal year, changes were brought to the governance structure of the modernization initiatives to ensure that solutions implemented are focused on improving client service.

CAS' stakeholders expect to be able to deal with the federal courts in the same manner as they do with other large public organizations that allow for electronic transmission/receipt of documents. However, CAS' current systems and technology are outdated: two completely different and very old case management systems are being maintained (one for the Federal Court of Appeal and Federal Court and one for the Tax Court) and these systems cannot be used to provide the reports needed for use in management decision-making. Although both systems have some e-filing capacity in that they provide the functionality of receiving, storing and retrieving electronic documents, the digital files received via the web for the Federal Court are not accessible through the Court's current Case Management System and the use of another application is necessary to access these files. As well, CAS is still printing most electronic documents it receives for storage in a paper court file. It is one of CAS' priorities to integrate all e-filed documents in the new integrated Case Management System currently under development, to facilitate the retrieval of all electronic documents through one interface and ultimately to increase our use of e-filing and provide a more efficient and effective service to all of CAS' clients.

It is CAS' goal to complete the development of the new CMS within the next few years to allow for a uniform method of electronic reception, transmission, storage and retrieval of all court files for all four courts.

The development of the new CMS was started in 2007-2008 using existing resources and building on improvements made to the server platform in the previous fiscal year. The development of the new CMS is led jointly by Registry Services and the IM/IT Division and it is being conducted in different phases over a three year period pending availability of resources. Phase 1, which was conducted during 2007-2008, consisted of upgrading the two different systems that exist in the Federal Courts and in the Tax Court and implementing a new common software and hardware infrastructure. Phase 1 was completed and launched in May 2008.

Phase 2 is being developed in 2008-2009 and will allow CAS to receive and store electronic documents within the CMS. Other phases of the CMS will follow and involve modules dealing with document receipt, scheduling, issuance of judgments, automated generation of correspondence and statistics, among others. It is expected that electronic access to court documents will create many efficiencies within CAS but above all it will improve our client service and significantly improve access to the courts for all Canadians.

During 2007-2008 CAS Registry Services and Information Technology staff worked on the following four separate initiatives to improve client service and productivity, and assist in the implementation of the new CMS; e-filing, e-scanning, digital recording and electronic distribution of judgments and orders:

E-filing: In May, 2007, the e-filing initiative was expanded to add Federal Court immigration and admiralty case types. This was in addition to the intellectual property proceedings which were available at the outset of the original pilot project in October 2005. It is planned to add the remainder of the Federal Court's jurisdiction in the fall of 2008.

In September 2007, an e-filing pilot commenced with the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) whereby Income Tax and GST certificate filings from two of CRA's National Tax Services Offices (TSOs) began to be e-filed. CRA has recently confirmed that it wishes to add more of its TSOs to this successful program in 2008-2009 and subsequent fiscal years.

E-scanning: The e-scanning initiative originated to improve service delivery by facilitating duplication of documents between Ottawa, Toronto and Montréal and as a consequence provide important savings in duplication and transportation costs.

The initiative involves the reconfiguration of equipment, the acquisition of high speed printers, the implementation of appropriate file format structures, the establishment of filenames based on an appropriate file naming convention and unique ID numbers for all documents. This initiative has required staff to identify and address a number of technical challenges that have allowed for improved duplication of documents between offices. It will also reduce the need for physical storage of files and increase staff productivity.

The most important benefit of this initiative, however, is that it is preparing registry staff for a time in the near future, when all court files will be kept electronically. It is anticipated that some parties will prefer to file paper copies of documents and therefore, scanning will always be necessary to complete the electronic files. As such, this initiative is allowing us to foresee and correct difficulties that would otherwise have arisen at that point in time. In 2008-2009 we will continue the expansion of e-scanning by acquiring additional equipment and by expanding the scope of our scanning activity.

Digital recording in courtrooms: The Service is developing a strategy for full deployment of mobile and permanent digital recording equipment in its courtrooms. In 2007-2008 a "Request for Proposal" (RFP) was submitted to Public Works and Government Services (PWGSC) and CAS staff has since been working diligently with PWGSC to complete the work on the RFP and ensure that the equipment is purchased as soon as possible. It is expected that the RFP process and the purchase of equipment will be completed in 2008-2009.

Electronic distribution of judgments and orders: This pilot project allows for the distribution of judgments and orders in an electronic format. This creates a more efficient process for our distribution office when sending copies of decisions to its clients and allows for a more timely delivery of our decisions to various legal publications. The pilot project also allows the registries to issue e-mailed courtesy copies of decisions to counsel when it is practical to do so thus improving our client service and overall efficiency.

Review of processes within Registry Services

During 2007-2008 a number of changes were brought to internal processes to improve service delivery. Efforts to train and cross-train staff to be able to better serve clients with respect to all four courts continued. Towards the end of the fiscal year the need to standardize registry processes in the different courts and across the country was identified as being an essential first step to developing, documenting and measuring our performance and to develop internal and external service standards. This work is continuing during 2008-2009.

Bill C-3 and Special Advocates

Bill C-3, an Act to amend the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act (certificate and special advocate) came into force on February 22, 2008, and with it the creation of the office of Special Advocate, whose role consists of protecting the interests of permanent residents or foreign nationals during in camera evidentiary hearings held in the context of the issuance of security certificates pursuant to that legislation.

Further to discussions with the Department of Justice during the course of 2007-2008, CAS agreed to provide certain forms of support to Special Advocates in the context of their review of classified material on CAS premises. Broadly speaking, this support consists of access to facilities within which Special Advocates may consult classified materials, as well as the provision of some administrative and other support to facilitate the preparation of court documentation for hearings in which the Special Advocates are principal participants.

This type of cross-departmental arrangement represents a first for CAS, and the effects of this initiative will be realized only in 2008-2009 and in subsequent years.

Judicial Services

The mandate of the Judicial Services Branch is to assist the Chief Administrator in providing the judiciary with adequate support to ensure that it may properly execute its functions.

The Judicial Services Branch consists of several Divisions such as the Offices of the four Chief Justices, the Law Clerks Program, the Judicial Assistants Division, the Assessment Division, the Library Services Division and the Revision Services Division.

The Offices of Chief Justices play a key role in supporting the Courts and their administration. Their many functions include providing administrative and executive assistance to the Chief Justices, assistance in the scheduling of court hearings, coordinating the Rules Committee meetings, strategic planning and implementation of special Court projects meetings and events, as well as liaison with stakeholders such as the Bar, the media and the public.

The Law Clerks program gives an opportunity to upcoming and recent graduates of Law Schools in Canada to apply for positions as Law Clerks to Judges, Deputy Judges and Prothonotaries of the Courts. Over 50 Law Clerks are employed every year. Under the direction of the judiciary, Law Clerks prepare case summaries, research questions of law and prepare detailed memoranda on facts and legal issues.

The Judicial Assistants Division offers office management and administrative services in support of the Judiciary.

The Library Services division provides the full range of special library services and makes available a collection of legal and other materials in electronic and paper formats to meet the immediate and long term needs of the judiciary and CAS. The services provided include a professional reference service, training and orientation sessions, an integrated catalogue of all library holdings, an intranet site, and a Newsdesk media monitoring service in which the day's top stories are selected. Services are provided using numerous online databases, inter-library partnerships and the library collections, comprised of over 6,000 books and 1,000 journal titles. The Library technical services section orders, processes and organizes over 300 new issues a week.

Finally, the Revision Services Division is made up of a team of four jurilinguists, who apply their linguistic skills and legal knowledge to the editing and revision of a variety of legal and administrative documents, including, most notably, draft judicial decisions and translations of judicial decisions. They provide as well linguistic and terminological advice and related services to judges and the CAS.

Corporate Services

The Deputy Chief Administrator, Corporate Services, is accountable to the Chief Administrator for providing overall corporate leadership and infrastructure in formulating, implementing and refining the Courts Administration Service's policies, guidelines, standards, systems, procedures and processes to integrate and deliver a variety of management and administrative programs and services in support of the operational programs, objectives, priorities and requirements of the Service and four federal Courts;

The Corporate Services Branch is composed of four specific areas of expertise:

  • Finance and Contracting, which includes financial management, accounting operations, contracting and materiel management services;
  • Information Management and Information Technology, which includes information management and records management, client services and infrastructure (including networks and telecommunications), and development and database services;
  • Human Resources, which includes staffing, classification, labour relations, official languages, learning, diversity, employment equity and compensation services;
  • Administrative, which includes facilities management, security, mail distribution, translation, as well as chauffeur and court usher services.

Human Resources

CAS employees are at the heart of our organization, and an important Human Resources project is underway to improve our work environment and to reflect the principles of the Public Service Modernization Act (PSMA). The Human Resources Department is undertaking important initiatives under this project in order for CAS to become an employer of choice. This project aims to develop an overarching human resources plan for CAS that will reflect the principles of the PSEA and be fully aligned with CAS' Report on Plans and Priorities.

A significant part of the six initiatives associated with this project concerns providing appropriate training for employees and delegated managers so that they clearly understand the PSMA's advantages as it applies to their roles and responsibilities. A comprehensive review of the policies affected by the PSMA is currently under way, and new procedures to support these policies are being developed.

By introducing this important project over the next year, the Service is hoping to train managers who will be well informed in the areas of human resources planning, staffing and employees' career develop-ment. Compulsory training for sub-delegated managers will begin in June 2008 and run until November 2008.

Also, our classification unit is creating new classification policies which will help supporting managers in their staffing duties. These policies relate to the following:

  • Classification Monitoring Framework
  • Organizational and Classification Guidelines
  • Organization and Classification Policy
  • Presentation of Classification Action Requests
  • Reorganization Procedures

The Service broadens its horizons

For several years, the Service has been collaborating with other judicial organizations on the international stage. Several countries have heard about the quality of our services and the innovation in our registry processes, and a number of delegations come to visit us every year.

Canada-Ukraine

The goals of the Canada-Ukraine Judicial Cooperation Project are to help Ukrainian judges and court staff improve the quality of justice and efficiency of operations within courts of general jurisdiction, as well as their accessibility to the public and transparency of operations.

In February and March 2007, a delegation of Ukraine judges and court staff from the model courts in Ukraine paid an extensive visit to Canadian courts, namely, at the Federal Court of Appeal, the Federal Court, the Court Martial Appeal Court of Canada, the Tax Court of Canada, and at CAS, in order to gain ideas about potential improvements of their courts in Ukraine.

In June 2007, a team of Canadian judges and court staff visited three model courts in Ukraine. The purpose of this visit was to develop a detailed assessment of the operations of the three courts designated to serve as models in this project. This assessment was meant to provide a baseline against which the project could determine the impact of model court activities and to help both sets of partners determine what improvements should be undertaken in the model courts.

Canada-China

As part of the Canada-China Judicial Linkages Project, the Service welcomed two Chinese judges for a six-week internship that ran from April 16 to May 25, 2007. The internship focused on judicial classification and covered such topics as the role and responsibilities of judges as well as the roles of various contributors at CAS who provide administrative services to the judges of the four courts. The internship was comprised of a theoretical and a practical component to facilitate the judges' learning.

During their stay, the judges had an opportunity to visit various sectors of the Service and the courts and to meet the Chief Justices and a number of judges of the Federal Court of Appeal, the Federal Court, the Court Martial Appeal Court of Canada and the Tax Court of Canada. During their internship, the Chinese judges also visited the Montréal and Toronto offices, where they were able to observe the Service's work in a regional office environment.

In October 2007, two other Chinese judges took part in an internship in Canada. That internship focused on case management. The judges spent two weeks at the Service and at our offices in Ottawa and Montréal. Their visit with us enabled them to upgrade their knowledge of our case management systems used by the Federal Court of Appeal, the Federal Court, the Court Martial Appeal Court of Canada and the Tax Court of Canada.

Appendices

Financial Reports

The Service is entirely funded by parliamentary appropriations and it received 63.7 million dollars in 2007-2008. With actual expenditures of 60.6 million dollars, there was a surplus at year end of 3.1 million dollars, or approximately 5% of the total available funding. Most of this funding will be carried forward to 2008-2009 to deal with projects not completed in 2007-2008. It should be noted that one of the principal causes of the surplus is the continued difficulty in recruiting and retaining staff, which is a problem plaguing most government organizations.

In addition to appropriations used to run court operations, CAS also collects revenue through filing fees, fines and sales of copies of filed documents, including judgments and orders. CAS cannot spend these revenues and they are deposited directly into the Consolidated Revenue Fund of Canada. In 2007-2008, these revenues accounted for 5.4 million dollars, a marked increase over 2006-2007 due to a large increase in fine revenue.

CAS continues to face certain ongoing financial pressures. For example, at the request of the Chief Justice of the Federal Court, four new Prothonotary positions were created for the Federal Court between 1999 and 2003. In addition, four new Deputy Judges have been appointed to the Federal Court since 2004. In December 2006, the Service did obtain temporary funding for those positions as well as their related support costs for the 2007-2008 fiscal year, but the funding must be requested year after year even though these requirements are ongoing. The Service will continue to work with the Treasury Board Secretariat and other partners on finding a permanent solution to fund these issues.

It should also be noted that over the years, the Service has absorbed certain additional expenses which have added to the financial stress on the organization. For example, it absorbed ongoing cuts pursuant to the Government's Expenditure Review that was conducted four years ago.

Further details of the financial performance of the Service are published in the Main Estimates tabled in Parliament and in the Service's annual Departmental Performance Report, available at: http://www.tbs-sct.gc.ca/est-pre/estime.asp

How to Contact the Service

All of our regional offices across Canada are listed below. In order to provide you with better service as well as access points as close to your residence as possible, the Service has established partnerships with provincial and territorial courts to offer services for any requests concerning the Federal Court of Appeal, the Federal Court, the Court Martial Appeal Court of Canada and the Tax Court of Canada.

Offices in the National Capital Region

Principal Office of the Service Thomas D'Arcy McGee Building

434 Queen Street
Ottawa, Ontario
K1A 7V7

Telephone: 613-996-4778
Fax: 613-941-6197
www.cas-satj.gc.ca

90 Sparks Street
Ottawa, Ontario
K1P 5B4

Courtrooms of the Federal Court of Appeal, Federal Court and Court Martial Appeal Court of Canada

Lorne Building Centennial Towers

90 Elgin Street
Ottawa, Ontario
K1P 5B8

Registry of the Federal Court of Appeal, the Federal Court and Court Martial Appeal Court of Canada
Telephone: 613-996-6795
613-995-9177 (Immigration)
Fax: 613-952-7226

Registry of the Federal Court
Telephone: 613-992-4238
Fax: 613-952-3653

* These Registries will be relocated to 90 Sparks Street in the fall of 2008.

200 Kent Street
Ottawa, Ontario
K1A 0M1

Registry and courtrooms of the Tax Court of Canada
Telephone: 613-992-0901
or 1-800-927-5499
Fax: 613-957-9034
TTY: 613-943-0946

Regional and Local Offices

Alberta

Calgary Edmonton

635 Eighth Avenue S.W.
3rd Floor
T2P 3M3

Telephone:
FCA/CMAC: 403-292-5555
FC: 403-292-5920
TCC: 403-292-5556
Fax: 403-292-5329
TTY: 403-292-5879

Scotia Place, Tower 1, Suite 530
P.O. Box 51
10060 Jasper Avenue T5J 3R8

Telephone:
FCA/CMAC: 780-495-2502
FC: 780-495-4651
TCC: 780-495-2513
Fax: 780-495-4681
TTY: 780-495-2428

British Columbia

Vancouver

Pacific Centre
P.O. Box 10065
701 West Georgia Street
V7Y 1B6

Telephone:
FCA/CMAC : 604-666-2055
FC: 604-666-3232
TCC: 604-666-7987
Fax: 604-666-8181
TTY: 604-666-9228

Prince Edward Island

Charlottetown

Sir Henry Louis Davies Law Courts
P.O. Box 2000,
42 Water Street
C1A 8B9

Telephone: 902-368-0179
Fax: 902-368-0266

Manitoba

Winnipeg

363 Broadway Street
4th floor
R3C 3N9

Telephone:
FCA/CMAC: 204-983-2232
FC: 204-983-2509
TCC: 204-983-1785
Fax: 204-983-7636
TTY: 204-984-4440

New-Brunswick

Fredericton Saint John

82 Westmorland Street
Room 100
E3B 3L3

Telephone:
FCA/CMAC: 506-452-2036
FC: 506-452-3016
TCC: 506-452-2424
Fax: 506-452-3584
TTY: 506-452-3036

110 Charlotte Street
Room 413
E2L 2J4

Telephone: 506-636-4990
Fax: 506-658-3070

Nova Scotia

Halifax

1801 Hollis Street
Room 1720
B3J 3N4

Telephone:
FCA/CMAC: 902-426-5326
FC: 902-426-3282
TCC: 902-426-5372
Fax: 902-426-5514
TTY: 902-426-9776

Nunavut

Iqaluit

Justice Building (Building #510)
P.O. Box 297
Iqaluit, Nunavut
X0A 0H0

Telephone: 867-975-6100
Fax: 867-975-6550

Ontario

London* Toronto

Registry of the FCA, FC, TCC
231 Dundas Street
3rd floor
N6A 1H1

Telephone: 519-645-4203
or 1 800-927-5499
Fax: 519-675-3391

*This facility is not a Registry point of service. It is a courtroom facility used for sittings in London only

Registry of the FCA, FC, CMAC, TCC
180 Queen Street
2nd floor
M5G 1R7

Telephone:
FCA/FC/CMAC: 416-973-3356
FCA/FC/CMAC: 416-973-3356
or 1-800-927-5499
Fax:
FCA/FC/CMAC: 416-973-2154
TCC: 416-973-5499
TTY:
FCA/FC/CMAC: 416 954-4245

Québec

Montréal Québec

Registry of the FCA, FC, CMAC
30 McGill Street
H2Y 3Z7

Telephone:
FCA/CMAC: 514-283-5200
FC: 514-283-4820
TCC: 514-283-9912
or 1 800 927-5499
Fax:
FCA/CMAC/FC: 514-283-6004
TCC: 514-496-1996
TTY: 514-283-3017

Palais de Justice
Room 500A and 500E,
300 Jean Lesage Blvd.
G1K 8K6

Telephone:
FCA/CMAC: 418-648-4964
FC: 418-648-4820
TCC: 418-648-7324

Fax: 418-648-4051
TTY: 418-648-4644

Saskatchewan

Regina Saskatoon

The Court House
2425 Victoria Avenue
S4P 3V7

Telephone: 306-780-5268
Fax: 306-787-7217

The Court House
520 Spadina Crescent East
S7K 2H6

Telephone: 867-667-5441
Fax: 867-393-6212

Newfoundland

St. John's

The Court House
P.O. Box 937
Duckworth Street
A1C 5M3

Telephone: 709-772-2884
Fax: 709-772-6351

Northwest Territories

Yellowknife

The Court House
P.O. Box 1320
4905 - 49th Street
X1A 2L9

Telephone: 867-873-2044
Fax: 867-873-0291

Yukon

Whitehorse

Andrew A. Phillipsen Law Centre
2131 Second Avenue

Y1A 5H6
Telephone: 867-667-5441
Fax: 867-393-6212

The Courts in Statistics

Proceedings Instituted or Filed

  FY 07/08 FY 06/07 FY 05/06
Federal Court of Appeal 616 695 699
Federal Court 30,428 30,355 30,928
General Proceedings and Immigration 7,460 8,286 9,712
Income Tax Act certificates 14,629 14,064 14,019
Goods and Services Tax certificates 7,848 7,614 6,972
Other instruments and certificates 491 391 225
Court Martial Appeal Court of Canada 10 8 5
Tax Court of Canada 4,395 5,197 4,849
Total 35,449 36,255 36,481

Court Judgments, Orders and Directions processed by the Registry

  FY 07/08 FY 06/07 FY 05/06
Federal Court of Appeal 1,997 2,005 2,295
Federal Court 19,228 20,724 23,118
Court Martial Appeal Court of Canada 47 23 22
Tax Court of Canada 12,709 9,999 8,118
Total 33,981 32,751 33,553

Files prepared for hearing and heard in Court
(does not include matters that were settled or discontinued prior to hearing)

  FY 07/08 FY 06/07 FY 05/06
Federal Court of Appeal 389 419 490
Federal Court 4,529 4,675 4,891
Court Martial Appeal Court of Canada 5 3 4
Tax Court of Canada 1,290 1,215 1,318
Total 6,213 6,312 6,703

Days in Court

  FY 07/08 FY 06/07 FY 05/06
Federal Court of Appeal 242 290 286
Federal Court 3,079 3,225 3,315
Court Martial Appeal Court of Canada 5 3 4
Tax Court of Canada* 2,159 2,218 2,378
Total 5,485 5,736 5,983

*For Tax Court of Canada "Days in Court" is defined as the number of court sitting days scheduled.

Recorded Entries

  FY 07/08 FY 06/07 FY 05/06
Federal Court of Appeal 21,324 23,027 23,972
Federal Court 211,189 216,034 257,508
Court Martial Appeal Court of Canada 393 213 203
Tax Court of Canada 144,659 142,723 143,111
Total 377,565 381,997 424,794

Total Dispositions

  FY 07/08 FY 06/07 FY 05/06
Federal Court of Appeal 685 581 729
Federal Court 7,469 8,424 10,280
General Proceedings and Immigration 7,469 8,424 10,280
Income Tax Act certificates n/a n/a n/a
Goods and Services Tax certificates n/a n/a n/a
Other instruments and certificates n/a n/a n/a
Court Martial Appeal Court of Canada 8 4 6
Tax Court of Canada 4,410 5,140 4,785
Total 12,572 14,149 15,800

Active Proceedings as of March 31st, 2008
Profile

Federal Court of Appeal

  FY 07/08 FY 06/07 FY 05/06
Appeals from Federal Court
(Final Judgment)
166 218 185
Appeals from Federal Court
(Interlocutory Judgment)
36 38 44
Appeals from Tax Court of Canada 151 171 157
Applications for Judicial Review 128 137 119
Others 48 28 23
Total 529 592 528

Federal Court

  FY 07/08 FY 06/07 FY 05/06
Aboriginal 244 244 255
Other appeals provided for by law 103 95 104
Admiralty 289 324 350
Intellectual property 697 667 715
Immigration 2,207 2,193 2,491
Crown 525 512 550
Judicial Review 686 738 713
Patented Medicines Regulations 95 89 73
Total 4,846 4,862 5,251

Court Martial Appeal Court of Canada

Data not available

Tax Court of Canada

  FY 07/08 FY 06/07 FY 05/06
Goods and Services Tax 974 1,002 913
Income Tax 5,652 5,507 5,333
Employment Insurance and Canada Pension Plan 760 915 1,119
Others 535 497 499
Total 7,921 7,921 7,864

Status

Federal Court of Appeal

  FY 07/08 FY 06/07 FY 05/06
Not perfected 350 384 340
Perfected 48 83 58
Consolidated 34 20 27
Reserved 8 25 15
Scheduled for hearing 75 70 68
Stayed 14 10 20
Total 529 592 528

Federal Court

  FY 07/08 FY 06/07 FY 05/06
Not perfected 3,224 2,999 3,634
Perfected 501 832 626
Consolidated 90 80 47
Reserved 106 79 117
Scheduled for hearing 476 426 505
Stayed 449 446 322
Total 4,846 4,862 5,251

Court Martial Appeal Court of Canada

Not available

Tax Court of Canada

  FY 07/08 FY 06/07 FY 05/06
Not perfected 1,011 1,769 964
Perfected 2,831 2,425 2,305
Reserved 277 343 225
Awaiting timetable 179 157 268
Scheduled for hearing 989 793 898
Specially Managed Cases 1,458 1,119 1,676
Awaiting another decision 1,176 1,315 1,528
Total 7,921 7,921 7,864

Glossary

Legal Expressions Definitions

Case management

Management of the Court's records.

Consolidated

When different cases that have the same parties or have certain elements in common are heard together.

Days in court

Each per diem court sitting where a registrar attends in person or by teleconference.

Directions of the court

Instructions by the Court, written or oral.

Interim order

An order that is not final.

Judgments and orders rendered

All decisions of the Court, including interim orders.

Matters heard

Appeals, trials, motions, judicial review applications, etc. that were heard by the respective court. This term includes, where applicable, dispute resolution conferences and pre-trial conferences.

Not perfected

When the parties have not yet done everything required of them, according to the rules or orders of the court, in order for the case to be ready to be scheduled for a hearing.

Order

Decision rendered by the Courts.

Perfected

When the parties have done everything required of them, according to the rules or orders of the court, in order for the case to be ready to be scheduled for a hearing.

Prothonotary

Prothonotary is a barrister appointed to assist in the efficient performance of the work of the court by exercising certain judicial powers, duties and functions as determined by the Rules.

Reasons

Detailed explanation by the Court for its decision.

Recorded entries

The number of individual records made in the respective case management automation systems that describe the various documents filed and received and events that have taken place.

Reserved

Decision that is not rendered immediately after a case has been heard or argued.

Stayed

When a case is placed "on hold". For example, where another related decision is to be made before the case can be continued.